The Faux Civil Rights of ‘Gay Marriage”

Take a moment to read this great article over at National Review by the excellent Catholic writer, George Weigel on ‘gay marriage‘.  In follow-up to New York’s recognition of homosexual union, Mr. Weigel addresses the successful strategy and tactics used by supporters to integrate homosexual behavior as ‘normal’ in American society.  He writes:

“Gay marriage” in fact represents a vast expansion of state power: In this instance, the state of New York is declaring that it has the competence to redefine a basic human institution in order to satisfy the demands of an interest group looking for the kind of social acceptance that putatively comes from legal recognition.”

Asking the rhetorical question as to where this self imposition of state competence in our private lives might end he follows up with a well-reasoned argument that hasn’t been well addressed; the qualifier on its own description:

“. . . what the New York state legislature approved has to be described, not as marriage, but as “gay marriage” or “same-sex marriage” is itself a verbal indicator that what is being done here is counter-intuitive.  We all know, or thought we knew, what marriage is, and to add the qualifier “gay” or “same-sex” is a tacit admission by the proponents of the practice that it requires an appeal to authority to enforce what seems strange, odd, not right.  The verbal tic of “gay marriage” or “same-sex” marriage is thus itself a rhetorical warning sign that what was done in Albany was an exercise in raw state power, the state’s asserting that it can do X simply because it claims that it has the power to do so.”

Not right, as in natural law – the basic understanding of what is vs. what isn’t strange, odd not right.  The basic fact is that homosexual behavior is immoral and no law will make it moral, ever.  Same sex attraction is without question a terrifically heavy burden to bear, but acting on the inclination is immoral, wrong.  Our Church teaches that any sexual acts outside of marriage is a moral sin.  As with all such problems in life, it is easy to say, read and write but terribly difficult for those who bear the burden of same-sex attraction.

The efforts of any state to change such an absolute truth are wasted.  This law, and all laws like it, will be corrected:

“. . . the argument over marriage will and must continue, because it touches first principles of democratic governance — and because resistance to the agenda of the gay-marriage lobby is a necessary act of resistance against the dictatorship of relativism, in which coercive state power is used to impose on all of society a relativistic ethic of personal willfulness.”

Mr. Weigel notes the fortuitous, though inaccurate, use of the civil rights movement, surmising that:

Marriage, as both religious and secular thinkers have acknowledged for millennia, is a social institution that is older than the state and that precedes the state.  The task of a just state is to recognize and support this older, prior social institution; it is not to attempt its redefinition.  To do the latter involves indulging the totalitarian temptation that lurks within all modern states: the temptation to remanufacture reality.

“. . . the ‘gay-marriage’ movement is thus not the heir of the civil-rights movement; it is the heir of Bull Connor and others who tried to impose their false idea of moral reality on others by coercive state power.”

The long battle to correct this error of legalizing ‘gay marriage’ is, frankly, has not yet begun in earnest.  While some states will offer religious protections, the reality is that in countries that began with religious tolerance are now actively charging religious with hate speech crimes.

We must begin with prayer and end with prayer; in between we must teach and inform with love and charity.

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One Response to The Faux Civil Rights of ‘Gay Marriage”

  1. wdednh says:

    Great post my friend 🙂

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